Samyak Yoga Blog

Guru: where are you?
By Yogacharya Rakesh
July 19, 2017

Belated wishes of Guru Purnima. We all Yogis and Yoginis remember our teachers, Gurus, and guides who have shown us the path of light, the path of wisdom, and feel gratitude. It is a wonderful feeling and a way of imprinting the importance of Light & Wisdom into our mind-body.

History

Let us see the historical significance. Guru Poornima is also celebrated as Vyasa Poornima. The full moon day of this month (Poornima) is the day of Vyasa. Vyasa was the one who classified the Vedas into four divisions such as RgVeda, YajurVeda, Sama Veda, and Atharva Veda. He became popular as Veda Vyasa, the one who classified the Vedas. He is also the codifier – composer of the great Indian epic – Mahabharata. As he composed the story in the form of poems, it was penned down by Lord Ganesha!

Vyasa has narrated, composed Mahabharata in its poetic form based on what was seen, experienced by him. Hence, it is a poetical expression of history. Considered as wise and respected in every corner of ancient India, he has also become the spiritual thread of holding the society intact.

He has also written the commentary on Yoga Sutras of Patanjali (There are some scholars claiming a different Vyasa being the author of this text, though).

He has also contributed to finding the essence of the Upanishads in the research text “Brahma Sutras“, one of the most significant texts on the study of the Upanishads.

Guru in Yoga Tradition

Veda Vyasa

Guru: A human being?

Vyasa being the torch-bearer of all the Gurus, worshipped on the day of Guru Poornima. A civilized society needs to respect and worship those who share the knowledge, wisdom, and bring the positive side of life into every human’s life. Hence, it is an important celebration.

Guru doesn’t have to be only a human being. If you have the eyes to see, Guru can be in anything and everything. Every situation in life can be a Guru.

Every living being can be a Guru. A tree teaches you how to balance. It is a Guru. A crow (Kakasana) teaches how to focus. It is a Guru.

A small kid teaches how to be pure. Someone teaches you how to be humble. Maybe a book that shares some knowledge.

It doesn’t have to relate to Yoga/spirituality. If I am able to learn something and that is making my life beautiful, the source is Guru. We are on earth for a short period of life and would love to lead a beautiful life. Anything/anyone helping me on this journey is my Guru.

To all those Gurus who are thousands in numbers, in living and non-living forms, let us always be grateful. The best way to be grateful to a Guru is by being a better student.

Happy Guru Poornima.

Read: An imaginary letter from Patanjali to a modern Yoga Student

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